Law vs. Little Free Library

You might be familiar with little free libraries, they might all look different ranging from a cupboard on a post to more ornate models with fancy woodwork or details added to make them look more like a house, but the idea behind them is still the same: a community accessible place to share books. Right now it’s estimated that there are over 16,000 of them world wide, you can find them in a wide variety of places, for example; peoples front yards and even in some standing libraries.

While the model is different from that of an actual library, the sentiment is the same and they’re garnered a lot of positive response. And not just as a “nice thing to do” either, little free libraries are now being seen as tools to be used to increase community engagement, address low-literacy issues, access to reading materials, and community unity (Collen, 2014).

Despite the benefits a Leawood man has been given a ultimatum by the city: take his down or face a citation as the little free library violates structural ordinances. Read the news story on it here

There are a number of solutions to the problem: the library could be moved so that it is attached to the house, or it was suggested by the City Administrator to see if the public library would be willing to host a similar initiative. But both of these suggestions are missing part of the point. The intention of little free libraries is that they are incredibly accessible and in a way that the public library often can’t be. 

Collen, L. (2014). Big Visions for Little Free Libraries: Literacy and Community Engagement. ILA Reporter, 32(3), 4-9.

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thelibraryperson:

The Machine: Using a Raspberry Pi for Readers’ Advisory - Matthew Murray
"A Raspberry Pi is a tiny, low-cost computer that was created to teach young people about computer science and programming. They’ve been embraced by the maker community and are being used for everything from robots to spinning wheels to cellphones to Minecraft servers
A few months ago I saw a post on Tumblr that showed an “Electr-O-Matic Book Fortune Teller” that used an Arduino (a computer similar to a Raspberry Pi) to print book recommendations onto receipt paper when people pushed a button.”
Read More…

thelibraryperson:

The Machine: Using a Raspberry Pi for Readers’ Advisory - Matthew Murray

"A Raspberry Pi is a tiny, low-cost computer that was created to teach young people about computer science and programming. They’ve been embraced by the maker community and are being used for everything from robots to spinning wheels to cellphones to Minecraft servers

A few months ago I saw a post on Tumblr that showed an “Electr-O-Matic Book Fortune Teller” that used an Arduino (a computer similar to a Raspberry Pi) to print book recommendations onto receipt paper when people pushed a button.”

Read More…

waitinginthemirrors
bookshop:

Parent calls cops on teen for giving free books away at a free book giveaway
So, this happened: Someone called the cops on a teenager for giving away free books.
At—wait for it—a book giveaway event.
Just last week, we wrote about the difficulties Sherman Alexie’s acclaimed Young Adult novel, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, had faced during its four-year-run as one of the most banned books in the U.S.
Two weeks ago, parents in the Idaho school district of Meridian successfully campaigned to remove Alexie’s novel from its 10th-grade reading curriculum and additional reading lists.
Wednesday night, irate parents literally called the cops to the scene where Meridian teens were passing out free copies of Alexie’s novel. Boise news station KBOI reported that even the cops were baffled about why they’d been asked to police a book giveaway.
A National Book Award-winner, The Absolutely True Diary is a searing coming-of-age story about a Native American teenager who decides to attend an all-white high school outside of his reservation. It’s a powerful narrative about modern race relations in the U.S. But the Meridian school board sided with parents who objected to its alleged sexual and anti-Christian content, along with, as noted by the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, other stuff:

[A]n adult named Lonnie Stiles complained that the Alexie novel contains language “we do not speak in our home.”

Apparently the adults who objected to the book weren’t thinking about the teens living on Idaho’s four Native American reservations. 
[READ MORE]

bookshop:

Parent calls cops on teen for giving free books away at a free book giveaway

So, this happened: Someone called the cops on a teenager for giving away free books.

At—wait for it—a book giveaway event.

Just last week, we wrote about the difficulties Sherman Alexie’s acclaimed Young Adult novel, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, had faced during its four-year-run as one of the most banned books in the U.S.

Two weeks ago, parents in the Idaho school district of Meridian successfully campaigned to remove Alexie’s novel from its 10th-grade reading curriculum and additional reading lists.

Wednesday night, irate parents literally called the cops to the scene where Meridian teens were passing out free copies of Alexie’s novel. Boise news station KBOI reported that even the cops were baffled about why they’d been asked to police a book giveaway.

A National Book Award-winner, The Absolutely True Diary is a searing coming-of-age story about a Native American teenager who decides to attend an all-white high school outside of his reservation. It’s a powerful narrative about modern race relations in the U.S. But the Meridian school board sided with parents who objected to its alleged sexual and anti-Christian content, along with, as noted by the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, other stuff:

[A]n adult named Lonnie Stiles complained that the Alexie novel contains language “we do not speak in our home.”

Apparently the adults who objected to the book weren’t thinking about the teens living on Idaho’s four Native American reservations

[READ MORE]

masteringmlis

masteringmlis:

clupper:

missquerious:

The more I think about it the more terrifying the state on information privacy becomes, it’s not something that I know a lot about in the first place, and it’s not something that I think about all that often beyond who does and does not have access to my facebook profile. But the more I have to…

Even though Google claims to be hesitant with sharing information with the government and law enforcement, I would bet that when push comes to shove, if the right people lean on them who can make their lives miserable (i.e. CIA, FBI) they will cave and hand over everything to avoid paying large fines or legal fee. I would be astounded if Google stood up for its users and defended their rights at the cost of their own time and money but crazier things have happened I guess.

I agree! Above all Google is a corporation, and even though they might have some sway, they are not above the law. If they really had to (such as for legal reasons), I would imagine they would comply. But I think it’s great that in some cases, they didn’t just hand over the information when asked (like in my presentation when I spoke about the AOL search leaks), which suggests (to me) they must have some sort of policy in place for situations like that.

It reminds me a little of things I’ve discussed in other classes, about how libraries need policies — such as only providing patron information with a warrant. It’s not the same with Google — I doubt police officers are just strolling up to the Google HQ and trying to use their presence to intimidate people behind the desk into handing over what they need — but the idea seems similar in my head. Google must have some set policy for how to deal with these requests, and I wouldn’t be surprised if they required a warrant before turning anything over, and even then, it would only be about a few select users, not every one of them.

I agree that it seems unlikely that Google wouldn’t back down should push come to shove. They wouldn’t want to make like difficult for themselves, after all.

(I apologize for the string of quotes — Tumblr doesn’t have a good system for replying to people.)

I think that their choice of whether or not to resist these kinds of requests for information probably depends on what kinds of economic outcomes they predict resulting from the fallout. Giving up hundreds of thousands of user records would probably have a negative effect on Google’s public image. Yahoo! gave up a bunch of information to the Chinese Government, but they also wanted an “in” into the Chinese market and being in the government’s good books would be a definite bonus for them.

Also, Google is essentially a monopoly, I can;t remember where I read it but somewhere around 76% of search engine inquiries come from Google. They have a lot of power and a lot of money for some very expensive lawyers, and a lot of money that they can throw around politically.

(Tumblr’s reply system does have some problems, I like how you can read the entire conversation but it does get long.  You can delete text that is irrelevant in what you’re reblogging to or just link to the post and use the @ tagging system to get the authors attention. i.e. masteringmlis )